Timetable: Boyne City, Gaylord & Alpena Railroad - Main Line - Boyne City to Alpena

Station MP from B.C. Notes
     
Boyne City 0.0  
Doyle     
Moore  6.1   
Boyne Falls  7.2  X/I=GRI, X=BF&N
Orville     
North Elmira  13.2  Overhead crossing of GRI
Mosher  14.8   
Marion  15.9   
Hallock  16.9   
Yuill  18.1   
Cameron     
Gaylord  23.2 X=MC
Sparr     
Schultz     
Marl     
Johnston     
Gibbs (Kissipipe)     
Gault     
Kaybee (KB)     
Meaford     
Camp 23     
Corbin     
Anderson     
Larson     
Atlanta     
Watson     
Dobbins     
Rust     
Connors     
Cahoon    
Canfield    
Mayburn    
Spratt    
Stinson    
Herron     
McHarg    
Kerston   X=DM
Alpena Jct.   X=DM (just north of north leg of wye) 
Alpena   X=DM (where yard is now)
     

Note Key: BB=Bascule Bridge | C=Coal | CS=Car Shop | D=Open > Day | DN=Open Day and night | DS=Dispatcher | DT=Double Main Track | EH=Enginehouse | HI=Half Interlocker | I=Interlocker | J=Junction | LB=Liftbridge | N=Open at night | P=Passing Track w/40' car capacity | RH=Roundhouse # stalls | S=Scales | SB=Swingbridge | T=Turntable | TC=Telegraph call | W=Water | X=Crossing | Y=Wye | Yard=Yard


This line was built east from Gaylord to Alpena. Most histories indicate that the line to Alpena was completed in August 15, 1918.  But a book titled Alpena Dates of Early Events published in 1915 [ADEE] states that there was a fire along the line at Spratt on May 26, 1914. They also noted that the line reached Atlanta from Gaylord on October 27, 1914. This would indicate that when the decision was made to extend the BCG&A between Gaylord and Alpena, it was done from both directions. The line was built west and utilmately both were connected somewhere near what is now the junction of M-33 and M-32. This would also make sense because a number of Alpena lumberman were bringing logs from the Hillman area into Alpena.

This line went through what is now Fletcher Floodwaters in western Alpena County. At the time, the floodwaters did not exist. The Thunder Bay River was damed after the abandonent of the railroad and it covered the right of way for several miles. The raised roadbed continues to exist under the water and it has been said to be a good spot to fish.